health

Regular Exercise Might Prevent Diabetes

Posted on January 2, 2009. Filed under: Fitness, health | Tags: , , , |

sicktiredebookcover_2
Image by alchymy8 via Flickr

A study done to assess whether exercise would have effects on the prevalence of diabetes among those who are at the highest risk of the disease (black women) has proven that it does indeed have a preventative effect. This is great news for all of us, as if exercise can prevent diabetes in those at highest risk it obviously also has an even greater positive effect on all others.

Read an excerpt from the article from Medical News Today:

“Taking a brisk walk several times a week for exercise appears to reduce black women’s risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a study published this month in the American Journal of Epidemiology, Reuters Health reports. Few studies have been conducted on the benefits of exercise among black women, according to Reuters. For the study, Julie Palmer of Boston University and colleagues used data from the ongoing Black Women’s Health Study that followed 45,000 black women from 1995 to 2005.

Researchers found that those who said they walked for a minimum of five hours weekly for exercise were one-third less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who did not walk. The risk of being diagnosed with the disease was significantly lower among women who said they regularly took a brisk walk even when taking into account possible contributing factors such as age, income and diet. The study included a large number of obese women and they too appeared to have a lower risk for developing diabetes if they exercised regularly.

Palmer said, “This is important, because it suggests a way to reduce diabetes risk even among the women who are at highest risk of the disease,” adding, “The finding that brisk walking for a few hours a week or longer reduces diabetes risk may be the most important finding of all. This is something almost all women can do in the course of their daily lives.”

Researchers also found that women who watched television for five or more hours a day were 86% more likely to develop diabetes than those who watched less than one hour per day (Norton, Reuters Health, 12/18).”

For those of you who just can’t seem to get motivated to exercise, We might have an answer for you HERE, to get started join the Vibrational Fitness and Health – Vibrational Weight Loss Program and get started the easy way.

“So easy it feels just like cheating.”

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Advertisements
Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 2 so far )

Keeping Those New Year Resolutions

Posted on December 29, 2008. Filed under: Fitness, health, weightloss | Tags: |

Sydney. Fireworks Newyear 2006. Opera House an...
Image via Wikipedia

We all make New Year resolutions, and at the time we all intend to keep them, don’t we? Then life just gets in the way and we slip back into old habits, eating at the wrong time, eating what ever comes quick and easy and unconsciously deciding we don’t have time to exercise.

Sound a bit like last year and the year before and the year before that?

Making a change in the way you percieve your resolutions is the only way to get them to stick! How? I hear you ask. Weeeellll…

It’s all to do with habits of thought, thinking it would be nice to stop smoking or lose weight and hoping or wishing we could stick to our resolutions really means that we have given it some thought and it’s a nice idea BUT we don’t really believe we will do it.

However this year do it differently, make each of your New Year resolutions something you know you will do by writing it down as a goal, something you intend to achieve and posting it somewhere you will see every day. My method is to put it on a brightly coloured Sticky Note in my diary and move it to the next day after deciding what I will do on that day as one step to reaching those goals I have written down.

That’s my rule, to schedule in one thing I will do to reach each of my goals everyday, it may be something small if I am having a particularly busy day but I will do something! So what goals do you have for the new year?

1. Write them down on a sheet of paper right now.

2. Make each of them a positive – e.g. “I am now a non-smoker” or “I am now slim and fit”

3. Put each of these affirmations onto a sticky note in a row from top priority to low priority and if your health is on the bottom you may need to revise your priorities, how can you achieve anything else if you are not healthy, fit and full of energy?

4. Stick your sticky note into your dairy and when you look at your diary each day read through your list of goals and mark down on that page what one thing you will do on that day to reach each of those goals – AND THEN FOLLOW THROUGH!!

Next thing you know you will have achieved all of those goals and be on your way to writing a new list, good for you!

Be Fit! Be Healthy! Be Slim! do it online…

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

How To Avoid Weight Gain During Menopause

Posted on December 1, 2008. Filed under: health, weightloss | Tags: , , , , , |

sicktiredebookcover_2

Image by alchymy8 via Flickr

The simple message to you all is eat less, move more and this rings true for all of us whether we are menopausal women or not. However, this report came out with a few things that rang bells for me as this is just where I am now and have been wondering why I am positively avoiding exercise until my brain tells me I better get on that machine or out the door for that walk. Read on and discover some answers from Medical News Today:

“One of the most interesting things that came out of the conference – with applicability to large numbers of women – was the discussion about why women gain weight during menopause,” said Dr Sainsbury-Salis.

“So many women get confused when they start to gain weight during menopause, because their eating habits haven’t changed.”

“What the research shows clearly is that menopause causes a dramatic and sudden reduction in physical activity levels. Just prior to menopause, women halve their amount of activity compared to pre-menopause levels.”

“So one reason women gain weight in menopause is because of a reduction in energy expenditure. Combine this with unchanged eating habits and weight gain is almost inevitable.”

“We don’t know exactly why menopausal women stop moving as much. But we know it’s not because of their age and the lifestyle constraints happening at that time of life. Research suggests it’s directly related to the lack of oestrogen, which has dramatic effects on signals the brain sends to the body. We’re doing research to see what causes these effects and whether or not they continue long-term.

“A lot of women ask whether they can actively counteract that tendency. In fact, it’s been shown that women who maintain or increase their level of physical activity during menopause tend to come out the other end without gaining weight.”

“Another thing, when physical activity levels drop and your energy needs are less, it’s really important to stay in tune with your hunger signals because you just don’t need to eat as much in order to feel satisfied.”

“During menopause, most women experience redistribution of fat, often gaining weight around the middle,” said Professor Campbell. “As we have demonstrated in our research, abdominal fat is a risk factor in the development of cardio-metabolic diseases, such as diabetes. Prior to menopause, women have a lower risk of heart disease than men. Menopause equalises that risk.

Well, I better go jump on my Vibration Platform for 10 minutes and get my body moving…

Be Fit! Be Well! do it oinline…

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 3 so far )

A Must Hear! Vaccine Maker Reveals Truth About Flu Shot

Posted on November 21, 2008. Filed under: health | Tags: , , , |

Thanks to Dr Mercola for this video: Vaccine manufacturer reveals much more than intended in this interview about mercury in vaccines, whether it works and more:

Be Fit! Be Well! do it online…

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Your Waistline Could Double Your Risk of Premature Death

Posted on November 17, 2008. Filed under: health, weightloss, wellbeing | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Silhouettes representing healthy, overweight, ...

Image via Wikipedia

This news item at Medical News Today says it all:

Large Waist Nearly Doubles Death Risk:

“The researchers wrote that previous studies relied heavily on BMI (body mass index, a person’s weight in kilos divided by the square of their height in metres) to assess the link between body fat (adiposity) and risk of death, but not many had looked into the effect of how the body fat is distributed.

For the study the researchers used data from 359,387 participants from 9 countries that were taking part in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), one of the largest long-term prospective studies in the world. The average age of the participants when data were first collected was 51.5 years, and 65.4 per cent were women.

Using a statistical tool called Cox regression analysis the investigators looked for links between BMI, waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio with risk of death, while taking into account other factors like age, location, education, smoking, alcohol, exercise and height.

The results showed that:

  • 14,723 of the participants died over a mean follow up period of 9.7 years.
  • Participants with a high BMI, compared with those in the medium range, were more likely to die from cardiovascular diseases and cancer.
  • Participants with a low BMI were more likely to die from respiratory diseases.
  • BMI of 25.3 for men and 24.3 for women was linked to the lowest risk of death.
  • After adjusting for BMI, waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio were strongly linked to risk of death.
  • The 20 per cent of participants with the largest waist circumferences (the top quintile) had waistlines measuring more than 120 cm or 47.2 in for men and more than 100 cm or 39.4 in for women.
  • The 20 per cent with the smallest waist circumferences (the bottom quintile) had waists smaller than 80 cm or 31.5 in for men and less than 65 cm or 25.6 in for women.
  • For every 5 cm increase in waist circumference the risk of death went up by 17 per cent in men and 13 per cent in women.
  • Comparing the top quintile for men had a relative risk of death of 2.05 (95 per cent confidence interval(CI) of 1.80 to 2.33) and for women this figure was 1.78 (95 per cent CI 1.56 to 2.04).
  • For waist to hip ratio the top to bottom quintile relative risks were 1.68 (95 per cent CI 1.53 to 1.84) for men and 1.51 (95 per cent CI 1.37 to 1.66) for women.

The results also supported earlier findings that BMI is strongly linked to risk of death in that, as the authors explained:

“BMI remained significantly associated with the risk of death in models that included waist circumference or waist-to-hip ratio (P<0.001).”

They conclude that these findings:

“Suggest that both general adiposity and abdominal adiposity are associated with the risk of death and support the use of waist circumference or waist -to-hip ratio in addition to BMI in assessing the risk of death.”

In a separate statement, the team from Imperial College London wrote that the study provides strong evidence that:

“Storing excess fat around the waist poses a significant health risk, even in people not considered to be overweight or obese.”

They said doctors should measure waistlines and hips as well as BMI when doing routine health checks.

The researchers found that waist to hip ratios varied widely among different countries in Europe.

They suggested that the reason increased waistlines are linked to higher risk of death could be that fatty tissue in the abdomen secretes cytokines, hormones and chemicals that are known to increase the risk of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases and cancer.

The lead author of the study, Dr Tobias Pischon, a Private Docent at the German Institute of Human Nutrition in Potsdam-Rehbrücke, explained that:

“Abdominal fat is not only a mere energy depot, but it also releases messenger substances that can contribute to the development of chronic diseases. This may be the reason for the link.”

The European coordinator of EPIC, professor Elio Riboli, from the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health at Imperial College London, said:

“Although smaller studies have suggested a link between mortality and waist size, we were surprised to see the waist size having such a powerful effect on people’s health and premature death.”

“Our study shows that accumulating excess fat around your middle can put your health at risk even if your weight is normal based on body mass index scores,” he added.

Riboli said that apart from smoking and drinking there are few other individual characteristics that can increase a person’s likelihood of early death.

Although the study did not look into why some people have larger waistlines the researchers suggested this was mainly due to genetic factors, physically inactive lifestyles and poor diets.

Riboli said:

“The good news is that you don’t need to take an expensive test and wait ages for the result to assess this aspect of your health – it costs virtually nothing to measure your waist and hip size.”

He said if you have a large waist you should exercise every day, avoid drinking too much alcohol and improve your diet.

“This could make a huge difference in reducing your risk of an early death,” he added.”

What can you do? Keep a lookout for our announcement coming soon, Wam Fit and Well introduces:

“Vibrational Weight Loss – So easy it’s just like cheating!”

We’re very close to launching our new program please stay tuned for the announcement.

Be Fit! Be Well! do it online…

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 2 so far )

Cigarette Smokers Are Boiling Frogs

Posted on November 14, 2008. Filed under: health | Tags: , , , , , , |

Boiling The Frog

Image by purpleslog via Flickr

It seems to me in this  day and age that people are not listening to the news or the research or the gross ads on TV about smoking being a way to sign your own death certificate. Young people are still taking up smoking and older people steadily refuse to quit.

It really is a case of “How to boil a frog!”

How to boil a frog: If you boil the water first, it’s hot and the frog although burned will jump right out and get away, so to boil a frog you put him in the pot while the water is cool and as it gradually heats he will enjoy the water cause it feels so good – until it is all to late and he cannot get out and boils himself into frog soup.

Cigarette smokers are the same: they start smoking to appear cool or because they tell themselves that they need it to stay calm. This is the cold water… even though they see all the ads about the bad health effects (the water is getting warmer) of smoking they ignore them cause it feels so good. Then when it is all too late and they have the cancer… You get the picture.

However, if a cancer appeared or they became impotent on their first cigarette, they would stop and never come back (the boiling water).

So as far as I am concerned people who smoke are in the act of becomming frog soup. If you need more evidence here are some links for you:

Study into the effects of smoking on nurses, death rates and incidences of disease:

http://www.physorg.com/news145800798.html

Study into affect of smoke on hearts shows your heart may actually alter it’s shape (not a good thing):

http://www.physorg.com/news145818349.html

and this one is a link to a new website that empowers young women to “live smoke free”:

http://www.physorg.com/news145818109.html

Be Fit! Be Well! Do it online…

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Metabolic Syndrome Leptin and Insulin Resistance Taking Over

Posted on November 10, 2008. Filed under: health, weightloss | Tags: , , , , , , |

sicktiredebookcover_2

Image by alchymy8 via Flickr

A study in the October Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, official publication of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM reports that statistics for Metabolic Syndrome (leptin and/or insulin resistance), could be as high as 1 in 4 American workers!

This cluster of resistance syndromes that result in premature aging, heart disease, obesity, diabetes and other inflammatory and immune system challenges is affecting so many people in the western world or who take on our western diet.

Metabolic syndrome is defined as having at least three of five disease risk factors: large waist circumference (more than 40 inches for men and 35 inches for women), high triglyceride levels, reduced levels of high-density cholesterol (HDL, or “good” cholesterol), high blood pressure, and high glucose levels. People with metabolic syndrome are at high risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes.

In the workplace sample, men and women had similar rates of metabolic syndrome, although men had a higher average number of risk factors. As the number of risk factors increased, so did the rate of lifestyle health risks such as obesity, low physical activity, high stress, and smoking. Workers with metabolic syndrome were also more likely to rate their own health as fair to poor, compared to workers with fewer risk factors.

Workers with more risk factors missed more work days because of illness. The percentage of workers with three or more sick days in the previous year increased from 25 percent for those with no risk factors to 39 percent for those with all five risk factors.

Metabolic syndrome was not linked to increased “presenteeism”-days the employee was at work but performing at less than full capacity because of health reasons. There was a trend toward higher rates of short-term disability, but this was not significant.

Affecting approximately 69 million U.S. adults, metabolic syndrome has major health and economic consequences. The new study is one of the first to examine the effects of metabolic syndrome in the working population.

The results draw attention to the high rate and impact of metabolic syndrome among U.S. workers. Dr. Burton and colleagues call for further studies to assess the impact of metabolic syndrome in the workforce, as well as to evaluate programs to identify and treat these high-risk workers.” Medical News Today

Another report states that studies into Metabolic Syndromes show that increasing your intake of calcium rich foods and getting some exercise could cut your risk of ending up with these health challenges and even manage them well enough to get off your medication.

“Health behaviors also appeared to have a significant influence. The researchers found that adults who reported little or no daily exercise had nearly twice the risk of developing the condition.

In addition, adults who failed to consume calcium-rich foods regularly had about 1.5 times the risk of developing metabolic syndrome, compared to adults who ate calcium-rich diets.” Medical News Today

There are methods that work, if you have any of the symtoms of Metabolic Syndrome, Insulin Resistance or Leptin Resistance we may have an answer:

Coming soon our new Vibr-Trim Weight Loss Studio will be opening soon online and in centre. More news soon.

Be Fit! Be Well! do it online…

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

10 Symptoms To Talk To Your Doctor About Immediately

Posted on November 7, 2008. Filed under: health, wellbeing | Tags: , , , , , |

Konventionelles Röntgenbild de...

Image via Wikipedia

Some symptoms are worth an immediate trip to your doctor, even if they turn out to be nothing read this list and keep it handy so that you are ready/

This list originally comes from the Mayo Clinic compliments of Medical News Today, and it is well worth passing on to all:

1. Trouble seeing, speaking or moving

Numbness or paralysis on one side of the body, difficulty speaking, and blurred or decreased vision are classic signs of a stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA), a ministroke that sometimes lasts only minutes. More atypical symptoms are fainting, shortness of breath or sudden feelings of facial pain, tiredness or a racing heart. Women may have the traditional stroke symptoms less often than men but also may be more likely than men to experience atypical symptoms first.

(Also look for sudden memory loss associated with a headache or feelings of pressure in the head, feeling as if a knife or hot needle has been inserted into the head or as if an electric shock or lightening has gone off in the head – people report their symptoms in odd ways at times.)

For any stroke symptoms, immediate emergency medical care is needed. Quick treatment for stroke can reduce the risk of brain damage or other complications.

2. A sudden excruciating headache

A headache that comes on like a thunderclap, with severe, excruciating pain could be caused by an aneurysm, bleeding in the brain, stroke, blood vessel inflammation, meningitis or a brain tumor. All require immediate medical attention. In addition, a headache that follows a head injury or is accompanied by fever, stiff neck, rash, confusion, seizure, double vision, weakness, numbness or speaking difficulties is reason to seek care. (See above: headaches can be just that a headache brought on by stress of some kind, they can also be a symptom of something much more grave)

3. Unexplained weight loss

Losing weight without trying can be cause for concern. A doctor’s appointment is warranted for a loss of 5 percent of body weight in one month, or more than 10 percent in six to 12 months. Underlying medical conditions could be an overactive thyroid, liver disease, depression or even some cancers.

(At times you can lose weight just because you are busier, more stressed or eating something that burns fat, it is sudden and unexplained that are the key words here and it is dramatic weight loss in a short time.)

4. Any breast change

A doctor should be consulted about a lump, nipple discharge or distortion, itching or skin changes (redness, scales, dimples or puckers), persistent breast pain or a change in breast size or shape.

5. Vaginal bleeding after menopause

Vaginal spotting or bleeding after menopause may be caused by changes in vaginal tissue, which can become thinner and more fragile as estrogen levels decrease. In some cases, however, postmenopausal bleeding can be a symptom of gynecological cancer. A medical evaluation is important.

6. Change in bowel habits

Mild diarrhea that lasts more than a week, constipation that lasts more than two weeks, or unexplained, sudden urges to have a bowel movement are reasons to consult a doctor. Also on the list are bloody diarrhea or stools that are black or tar colored. These symptoms could result from infection, medication side effects, a digestive disorder or colon cancer.

(Also look for pain with no bowel movements, this can come on suddenly or manifest over time, it can mean a bowel obstruction and not all of them happen suddenly, especially in older people they can be preceded by months or weeks of unexplained bowel pain put down to normal constipation)

7. Feeling full after eating less

Feeling fuller than normal after eating less than usual could warn of gastrointestinal problems, ranging from indigestion caused by acid reflux to some cancers. If this feeling lasts for days or weeks, a physician should be consulted, especially if other symptoms are present such as nausea and vomiting, abdominal pain or bloating, fever and chills or weight changes. (See above)

8. Persistent cough

A cough that lingers more than a month, is affecting sleep or brings up blood or sputum, is cause for a checkup. A chronic cough could be caused by asthma, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a respiratory tract infection, chronic bronchitis or even lung cancer.

9. Sad or depressed mood

Feeling sad for weeks or months is a symptom of depression, a medical illness that’s treatable. Other signs might include a loss of interest in normal activities, feeling hopeless, crying easily, trouble concentrating, unintentional weight loss and thoughts of wanting to die.

10. Persistent or high fever

A doctor should be consulted when a low-grade fever (100.4 to 103 F) persists for more than a week. Fever can indicate a urinary tract infection or more serious illnesses such as immune disorders or cancer. A sudden high fever, greater than 103 F, requires immediate evaluation.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Resitance Training Proved To Aid in Glucose Control in Diabetes

Posted on November 3, 2008. Filed under: Fitness, health, weightloss | Tags: , , , , , , , |

Vibrodisc-1 small

Image by alchymy8 via Flickr

An article in Medical News Today about a new research study done on diabetes has shown that resistance training in combination with traditionally used aerobic training can help diabets gain control over their blood glucose levels faster and with more efficiency.

What does this mean? Basically diabetic people are “Starved of movement.” as one Robin Marcus, spokesperson for the American Physical Therapy Association. Movement is key to regaining control of your blood sugar and managing your diabetes more efficicently, to the point where you may even be able to stop your medication.

“Although aerobic exercise is still key in treating diabetes, it should not be used in isolation,” Marcus observes. “As people age, they lose muscle mass and, subsequently, mobility, resulting in a greater risk of falls. Adding resistance training to the diabetes treatment regimen leads to improved thigh lean tissue which, in turn, may be an important way for patients to increase resting metabolic rate, protein reserve, exercise tolerance, and functional mobility, she notes.”

One of the easiest ways to get started on resistance training is to use a Vibration Platform, no matter how unfit or fit you are just standing on the machine for just 10 minutes a day can give you the equivalent of a 40 minute workout. Using movements to boost your workout as you regain your fitness only enhances the effect of the vibration on your muscles and builds strength and flexibility at the same time as boosting your stamina. Get started today.

Be Fit! Be Well! do it online…

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Diabetes The Cost to Your Health and Your Pocket

Posted on October 31, 2008. Filed under: health, weightloss | Tags: , , , , , , , |

sicktiredebookcover_2

Image by alchymy8 via Flickr

Over the past 10 years, diabetes rates have doubled in most Western Countries! Yes doubled!!

This survey of diagnosed diabetes rates in the US,   the first of its kind in the US proves the point, and that doesn’t count the many un-diagnosed diabetics or those with leptin or insulin resistance around the US.  But it does prove that everyone eating a western diet needs to wonder why and then act on the information they uncover. We are literally eating ourselves to death, through pure indulgence.

The financial cost of these rising incidences of diabetes around the world are reflected in the financial cost to governments and consumers shown here in this article:

“Because of the increased number of patients, growing reliance on multiple medications and the shift toward more expensive new medicines, the annual cost of diabetes drugs nearly doubled in only six years, rising from $6.7 billion in 2001 to $12.5 billion in 2007 according to a study in the Oct. 27, 2008, issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Since more then one-tenth of all health care expenditures in the United States in 2002 were attributable to diabetes, this finding raises important questions about whether the higher cost actually translates into improved care.”
What can you do for your family? Rethink what you and your family are eating. Get some information on Insulin Resistance and Leptin Resistance the two leading causes of diabetes, heart disease, PCOS, obesity, WAT, and age related declines.

Take a look at these eBooks, written specifically about these health challenges and what you can do about them.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( 1 so far )

« Previous Entries

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...