Regular Exercise Might Prevent Diabetes

Posted on January 2, 2009. Filed under: Fitness, health | Tags: , , , |

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A study done to assess whether exercise would have effects on the prevalence of diabetes among those who are at the highest risk of the disease (black women) has proven that it does indeed have a preventative effect. This is great news for all of us, as if exercise can prevent diabetes in those at highest risk it obviously also has an even greater positive effect on all others.

Read an excerpt from the article from Medical News Today:

“Taking a brisk walk several times a week for exercise appears to reduce black women’s risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a study published this month in the American Journal of Epidemiology, Reuters Health reports. Few studies have been conducted on the benefits of exercise among black women, according to Reuters. For the study, Julie Palmer of Boston University and colleagues used data from the ongoing Black Women’s Health Study that followed 45,000 black women from 1995 to 2005.

Researchers found that those who said they walked for a minimum of five hours weekly for exercise were one-third less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who did not walk. The risk of being diagnosed with the disease was significantly lower among women who said they regularly took a brisk walk even when taking into account possible contributing factors such as age, income and diet. The study included a large number of obese women and they too appeared to have a lower risk for developing diabetes if they exercised regularly.

Palmer said, “This is important, because it suggests a way to reduce diabetes risk even among the women who are at highest risk of the disease,” adding, “The finding that brisk walking for a few hours a week or longer reduces diabetes risk may be the most important finding of all. This is something almost all women can do in the course of their daily lives.”

Researchers also found that women who watched television for five or more hours a day were 86% more likely to develop diabetes than those who watched less than one hour per day (Norton, Reuters Health, 12/18).”

For those of you who just can’t seem to get motivated to exercise, We might have an answer for you HERE, to get started join the Vibrational Fitness and Health – Vibrational Weight Loss Program and get started the easy way.

“So easy it feels just like cheating.”

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Your Waistline Could Double Your Risk of Premature Death

Posted on November 17, 2008. Filed under: health, weightloss, wellbeing | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

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This news item at Medical News Today says it all:

Large Waist Nearly Doubles Death Risk:

“The researchers wrote that previous studies relied heavily on BMI (body mass index, a person’s weight in kilos divided by the square of their height in metres) to assess the link between body fat (adiposity) and risk of death, but not many had looked into the effect of how the body fat is distributed.

For the study the researchers used data from 359,387 participants from 9 countries that were taking part in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), one of the largest long-term prospective studies in the world. The average age of the participants when data were first collected was 51.5 years, and 65.4 per cent were women.

Using a statistical tool called Cox regression analysis the investigators looked for links between BMI, waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio with risk of death, while taking into account other factors like age, location, education, smoking, alcohol, exercise and height.

The results showed that:

  • 14,723 of the participants died over a mean follow up period of 9.7 years.
  • Participants with a high BMI, compared with those in the medium range, were more likely to die from cardiovascular diseases and cancer.
  • Participants with a low BMI were more likely to die from respiratory diseases.
  • BMI of 25.3 for men and 24.3 for women was linked to the lowest risk of death.
  • After adjusting for BMI, waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio were strongly linked to risk of death.
  • The 20 per cent of participants with the largest waist circumferences (the top quintile) had waistlines measuring more than 120 cm or 47.2 in for men and more than 100 cm or 39.4 in for women.
  • The 20 per cent with the smallest waist circumferences (the bottom quintile) had waists smaller than 80 cm or 31.5 in for men and less than 65 cm or 25.6 in for women.
  • For every 5 cm increase in waist circumference the risk of death went up by 17 per cent in men and 13 per cent in women.
  • Comparing the top quintile for men had a relative risk of death of 2.05 (95 per cent confidence interval(CI) of 1.80 to 2.33) and for women this figure was 1.78 (95 per cent CI 1.56 to 2.04).
  • For waist to hip ratio the top to bottom quintile relative risks were 1.68 (95 per cent CI 1.53 to 1.84) for men and 1.51 (95 per cent CI 1.37 to 1.66) for women.

The results also supported earlier findings that BMI is strongly linked to risk of death in that, as the authors explained:

“BMI remained significantly associated with the risk of death in models that included waist circumference or waist-to-hip ratio (P<0.001).”

They conclude that these findings:

“Suggest that both general adiposity and abdominal adiposity are associated with the risk of death and support the use of waist circumference or waist -to-hip ratio in addition to BMI in assessing the risk of death.”

In a separate statement, the team from Imperial College London wrote that the study provides strong evidence that:

“Storing excess fat around the waist poses a significant health risk, even in people not considered to be overweight or obese.”

They said doctors should measure waistlines and hips as well as BMI when doing routine health checks.

The researchers found that waist to hip ratios varied widely among different countries in Europe.

They suggested that the reason increased waistlines are linked to higher risk of death could be that fatty tissue in the abdomen secretes cytokines, hormones and chemicals that are known to increase the risk of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases and cancer.

The lead author of the study, Dr Tobias Pischon, a Private Docent at the German Institute of Human Nutrition in Potsdam-Rehbrücke, explained that:

“Abdominal fat is not only a mere energy depot, but it also releases messenger substances that can contribute to the development of chronic diseases. This may be the reason for the link.”

The European coordinator of EPIC, professor Elio Riboli, from the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health at Imperial College London, said:

“Although smaller studies have suggested a link between mortality and waist size, we were surprised to see the waist size having such a powerful effect on people’s health and premature death.”

“Our study shows that accumulating excess fat around your middle can put your health at risk even if your weight is normal based on body mass index scores,” he added.

Riboli said that apart from smoking and drinking there are few other individual characteristics that can increase a person’s likelihood of early death.

Although the study did not look into why some people have larger waistlines the researchers suggested this was mainly due to genetic factors, physically inactive lifestyles and poor diets.

Riboli said:

“The good news is that you don’t need to take an expensive test and wait ages for the result to assess this aspect of your health – it costs virtually nothing to measure your waist and hip size.”

He said if you have a large waist you should exercise every day, avoid drinking too much alcohol and improve your diet.

“This could make a huge difference in reducing your risk of an early death,” he added.”

What can you do? Keep a lookout for our announcement coming soon, Wam Fit and Well introduces:

“Vibrational Weight Loss – So easy it’s just like cheating!”

We’re very close to launching our new program please stay tuned for the announcement.

Be Fit! Be Well! do it online…

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Resitance Training Proved To Aid in Glucose Control in Diabetes

Posted on November 3, 2008. Filed under: Fitness, health, weightloss | Tags: , , , , , , , |

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An article in Medical News Today about a new research study done on diabetes has shown that resistance training in combination with traditionally used aerobic training can help diabets gain control over their blood glucose levels faster and with more efficiency.

What does this mean? Basically diabetic people are “Starved of movement.” as one Robin Marcus, spokesperson for the American Physical Therapy Association. Movement is key to regaining control of your blood sugar and managing your diabetes more efficicently, to the point where you may even be able to stop your medication.

“Although aerobic exercise is still key in treating diabetes, it should not be used in isolation,” Marcus observes. “As people age, they lose muscle mass and, subsequently, mobility, resulting in a greater risk of falls. Adding resistance training to the diabetes treatment regimen leads to improved thigh lean tissue which, in turn, may be an important way for patients to increase resting metabolic rate, protein reserve, exercise tolerance, and functional mobility, she notes.”

One of the easiest ways to get started on resistance training is to use a Vibration Platform, no matter how unfit or fit you are just standing on the machine for just 10 minutes a day can give you the equivalent of a 40 minute workout. Using movements to boost your workout as you regain your fitness only enhances the effect of the vibration on your muscles and builds strength and flexibility at the same time as boosting your stamina. Get started today.

Be Fit! Be Well! do it online…

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Diabetes The Cost to Your Health and Your Pocket

Posted on October 31, 2008. Filed under: health, weightloss | Tags: , , , , , , , |

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Over the past 10 years, diabetes rates have doubled in most Western Countries! Yes doubled!!

This survey of diagnosed diabetes rates in the US,   the first of its kind in the US proves the point, and that doesn’t count the many un-diagnosed diabetics or those with leptin or insulin resistance around the US.  But it does prove that everyone eating a western diet needs to wonder why and then act on the information they uncover. We are literally eating ourselves to death, through pure indulgence.

The financial cost of these rising incidences of diabetes around the world are reflected in the financial cost to governments and consumers shown here in this article:

“Because of the increased number of patients, growing reliance on multiple medications and the shift toward more expensive new medicines, the annual cost of diabetes drugs nearly doubled in only six years, rising from $6.7 billion in 2001 to $12.5 billion in 2007 according to a study in the Oct. 27, 2008, issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Since more then one-tenth of all health care expenditures in the United States in 2002 were attributable to diabetes, this finding raises important questions about whether the higher cost actually translates into improved care.”
What can you do for your family? Rethink what you and your family are eating. Get some information on Insulin Resistance and Leptin Resistance the two leading causes of diabetes, heart disease, PCOS, obesity, WAT, and age related declines.

Take a look at these eBooks, written specifically about these health challenges and what you can do about them.

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Diabetes May be Delayed by Drinking Green Tea

Posted on October 25, 2008. Filed under: health, weightloss, wellbeing | Tags: , , , , , |

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The Medical College of Georgia has come out with some amazing research on Green Tea, a powerful antioxidant apparently lies lurking within it fresh, green depths that can help delay the onset of Diabetes 1.

“Researchers were testing EGCG, green tea’s predominant antioxidant, in a laboratory mouse with type 1 diabetes and primary Sjogren’s syndrome, which damages moisture-producing glands, causing dry mouth and eyes.

“Our study focused on Sjogren’s syndrome, so learning that EGCG also can prevent and delay insulin-dependent type 1 diabetes was a big surprise,” says Dr. Stephen Hsu, molecular/cell biologist in the School of Dentistry.

They found it also worked well in their original disease focus.

In the mouse, EGCG reduced the severity and delayed onset of salivary gland damage associated with Sjogren’s syndrome, which has no known cure.

“EGCG modulates several important genes, so it suppresses the abnormality at the molecular level in the salivary gland. It also significantly lowered the serum autoantibodies, reducing the severity of Sjogren’s syndrome-like symptoms,” Dr. Hsu says. Autoantibodies are antibodies the body makes against itself.

Both type 1 diabetes and Sjogren’s syndrome are autoimmune diseases, which cause the body to attack itself. Autoimmune disorders are the third most common group of diseases in the United States and affect about 8 percent of the population, says Dr. Hsu. Sjogren’s syndrome can occur alone or secondary to another autoimmune disease, such as lupus, rheumatoid arthritis or type 1 diabetes.

The study, published in the Oct. 24 issue of Life Sciences, supports earlier research showing EGCG’s impact on helping prevent autoimmune disease.” (Physorg.com)

More and more information about antioxidants is coming out every day, but what does it really means for us? We need to get back to basics, back to eating real food, food that is farmed with nutrients in mind and eating it while it is still fresh and alive.

Get lots of organic, whole, raw food back into your diet and live longer and healthier is the outcome of all this new research into what’s good for us.

Be Fit! Be Well! Do it online…

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Transfats Terminated in California

Posted on July 28, 2008. Filed under: health, weightloss, wellbeing | Tags: , , , , , , , |

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WOW!! Arnold has taken a bold stand as Governator of California he has legislated the ban of Transfats in his state of California.

“The legislation signed by Schwarzenegger will take effect Jan. 1, 2010, for oil, shortening and margarine used in spreads or for frying. Restaurants could continue using trans fats to deep-fry yeast dough and in cake batter until Jan. 1, 2011.

Trans fats occur naturally in small amounts in meat and dairy products. Most trans fats are created when vegetable oil is treated with hydrogen to create baked and fried goods with a longer shelf life.

Stephen Joseph, a Tiburon attorney who was a consultant to New York City in developing its ban, said trans fat is a larger health risk than saturated fat because it reduces so-called good cholesterol.

A 2006 review of trans fat studies by the New England Journal of Medicine concluded there was a strong connection between consumption of trans fats and heart disease. Studies also have linked trans fats to diabetes, obesity, infertility in women and some types of cancer.

Trans fats are like cigarettes, with no safe level of consumption, said Jeffrey Luther, a Long Beach doctor who is president of the California Academy of Family Physicians.” Courtesy of Physorg

What about in Australia?? This is what Today Tonight had to say in their special last year:

Trans fats are linked to the death of 25 per cent of our population.

In Australia there is one death every eight minutes from heart disease.

We uncovered foods with the highest trans fats.

Butter has 4.2 per cent natural trans fats with dairy blend full-fat spreads at 3.2 per cent.

Reduced fat blends have 2.3 per cent with a cheese and spinach pastry roll containing 2.2 per cent trans fats.

Puff pastry made with butter contains 2 per cent while camembert and brie cheese contain up to 1.3 per cent.

Popcorn and ice cream have 1.2 per cent, doughnuts 1.1 per cent and regular cooking oils (not including olive oil) contain between 0.5 per cent and 1 per cent.

Trans fats also are prevalent in muffins, cream-filled sweet biscuits, cheese spreads, quiche, sausage rolls, lasagne, milk-powder, potato crisps, fries from fast food outlets, cheesecake and pastries.

Research suggests a diet of just 2 per cent trans fats can increase the risk of having a heart attack by 23 per cent.

Nutritionist, Matt O’Neil, said some products are misleading.

“We’ve eaten natural trans fats for a long time, but it’s only in the last three or four decades that we’ve dramatically increased our consumption of man-made trans fats,” he said.

“That is not good for us, we need to get them out of our food supply.”

Other countries around the world have mandated labelling of trans fats, according to Food Sociologist, Dr Gygory Scrinis, from RMIT’s Globalism Institute.

“I think it is outrageous that Food Standards Australia has decided earlier this year not to label trans fats on foods and nor to regulate the amount of trans fats in foods,” he said.

“The food industry may simply replace trans fats with other highly processed and chemically engineered ingredients.” Today Tonight

We need to let our government know that we want to follow suit and ban all man-made Transfats from Australian diets.

How can you avoid them? Look at your food labels and avoid anything that includes: Partially hydrogenated oil or fats, hydrogenated oils or fats.

Why avoid them? Apart from the proven evidence that they can lead to heart disease, there is also some evidence and ongoing research into their role in contributing to some cancers (particularly bowel and pancreatic), diabetes, Liver dysfunction and infertility.

Be Fit! Be Well! Do it online…

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Just a Little Walk Improves Heart Disease and Colon Cancer

Posted on April 1, 2008. Filed under: Fitness, health, wellbeing | Tags: , , , , , , |

French Doctors report that an overview of the latest research into spot and good health proves that moderate, frequent exercise improves your chances of surviving and controlling heart disease, diabetes, colon cancer, respiratory disease and depression.

This report by the National Institute for Health and Medical Research (inserm) sets a benchmark, for adults of at least 30 minutes of modest exercise, such as fast walking, at least 5 times a week, or 20 minutes of harder exercise, such as jogging 3 times a week.

Younger people are advised to to twice this.

In addition Inserm recommends “strengthening” and stretching at least twice a week, and even advises the elderly to do more stretching.

Daily activities such as climbing stairs and cleaning your bathroom can also be included in the exercise tally. (Good to know doing housework is good for something :0)

Be Fit. Be Well. Do it Online!

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Manage These Common Conditions Without Meds

Posted on March 31, 2008. Filed under: health, wellbeing | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

News of managing your conditions using natural health is slowly filtering into the medical field, and this article is a breakthrough – I have added a few of my own tips through out just to give you a little more knowledge.

ScienceDaily (Mar. 26, 2008) — We’ve gotten used to taking pills for everything that ails us, but medications have side effects and cost money. The April 2008 issue of the Harvard Health Letter takes a look at how to manage seven common conditions without taking medication. It takes some discipline, but in many cases, the nonpharmacological approach can do as much as pills.

Here’s a brief look at the conditions and treatments.

Arthritis

There’s a good chance that losing weight will make arthritis less painful. Combine weight loss with exercise and you may have less pain and more mobility. Even for those who don’t need to lose weight, exercise that doesn’t put “load” on the joints reduces pain. Annie says: taking 6 Fish Oil and using some Magnesium, Calcium and Vit D wouldn’t hurt either, along with whatever targeted supplement you elect to use.

Cholesterol

Your LDL level may drop by 5% or so if you keep foods high in saturated fat off the menu. Additional soluble fiber may reduce LDL levels as well. So can margarines fortified with sterols. Annie says, I have to say I am not impressed with margerine, and your cholesterol levels are greatly added to by your intake of refined grains, so eat more vegetables and fruit and dress your salads with yummy olive oil dressings to cut the cholesterol.

Cognitive decline

Memory training and other “brain exercises” seem to help healthy older people stay sharp. But physical exercise may benefit the brain more than mental gymnastics. This is a great idea and Fish Oil feeds your brain along with sunshine (yes 15 mins a day in the morning is good for you) and choline a derivative of B vitamins.

Depression

Studies have shown that regular physical activity can have a potent antidepressant effect. Studies prove this to be true and for those who are just too depressed to be bothered a Vibration Platform may be the answer, along with Meditating on what you have in your life to be grateful for (see previous article)

Diabetes

Regular physical activity is a powerful brake on blood sugar levels as well, because exercised muscle becomes more receptive to the insulin that helps it pull sugar in from the bloodstream. Eating fewer sweets and easy-to-digest carbohydrates also helps control blood sugar levels. This is so true and my eBooks “A Rainbow On My Plate” and “Sick, Tired & Overweight” deal with this very issue.

High blood pressure

Losing weight, getting more exercise, and eating less sodium all lower blood pressure.  As does meditation, and learning to think creatively, eating more vegetables and fruit (more alkaline foods),

Osteoporosis

Weight-bearing exercise puts stress on bones, and bone tissue reacts by getting stronger and denser, fending off osteoporotic processes. Extra vitamin D and calcium top the list of dietary recommendations. This is good advice, I would add in a little Fish Oil but essentially this advice is perfect.

Adapted from materials provided by Harvard Health Letter, via Newswise.

Be Fit Be Well. Do it Online. 

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Are You Insulin Resistant?

Posted on February 26, 2008. Filed under: health, weightloss, wellbeing | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

insresist_w300_h2401.jpg Do you have the signs of being Insulin Resistant? Are you pre-diabetic?

Do you have heart disease, high blood pressure or high cholesterol levels?

Are you gaining weight around your middle even though you’re dieting?

Are you depressed or chronically tired?

Do you have Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome?

Do you have non-viral Chronic Fatigue or Fibro-myalgia?

If you have one or more of these symptoms, you just might be Insulin Resistant.

What is Insulin Resistance?

Insulin is a hormone that is produced by your pancreas to help the body to utilize sugars in your diet, it helps the glucose (sugar) pass from your blood into your cells. Once it is in your cells, it is either used to fuel muscles or stored as fat for future needs.

Insulin resistance happens when a diet high in carbohydrates forces the cells to resist the flood of carbohydrates and all that glucose just stays in the blood, and not only do you now have high blood sugar which is the forerunner to diabetes, the pancreas continues to produce more insulin and you now have insulin overload as well.

What are the symptoms of Insulin Resistance?

  1. Fatigue.
  2. Brain fogginess and inability to focus. Sometimes the fatigue is physical, but often it’s mental.
  3. Low blood sugar. Mild, brief periods of low blood sugar are normal during the day, especially if meals are not eaten on a regular schedule. But prolonged hypoglycaemia with some of the symptoms listed here, especially physical and mental fatigue, are not normal. Feeling agitated, jittery, moody, nauseated, or having a headache is common in Insulin Resistance, with almost immediate relief once food is eaten.
  4. Intestinal bloating. Most intestinal gas is produced from carbohydrates in the diet. Insulin Resistance sufferers who eat carbohydrates suffer from gas, lots of it.
  5. Sleepiness. Many people with Insulin Resistance get sleepy immediately after eating a meal containing more than 20% or 30% carbohydrates.
  6. Weight gain, fat storage, difficulty losing weight. For most people, too much weight is too much fat. The fat in IR is generally stored around the midsection in both males and females.
  7. Increased triglycerides.
  8. Increased blood pressure. It is a fact that most people with hypertension have too much insulin and are Insulin Resistant. It is often possible to show a direct relationship between the level of insulin and blood pressure: as insulin levels elevate so does blood pressure.
  9. Depression. Because carbohydrates are a natural “downer,” depressing the brain, it is not uncommon to see many depressed persons who also have Insulin Resistance.**

What can be done?

First of all the good new is Insulin Resistance can be controlled by diet, this is a whole new lifestyle, not a diet that you do for a few weeks or months. A whole new way of eating and exercising is needed. If you need more help there are some drug treatments and supplements that can greatly help with the challenge of getting your insulin and blood sugar under control. The great new is that once you have changed your lifestyle, most if not all of your previous health challenges will often disappear completely.

For more information on Insulin Resistance and the Lifestyle choices you need to make please see my eBooks “Sick, Tired and Overweight” and “A Rainbow on My Plate” on http://www.health-fitness-videos.com or click the link to Wamuran Fitness and Wellbeing in the left sidebar under the heading “Blogroll”.

**This is not a guide to the various types of depression and in no way constitutes a medical diagnosis or recommendation.

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