Metabolic Syndrome Leptin and Insulin Resistance Taking Over

Posted on November 10, 2008. Filed under: health, weightloss | Tags: , , , , , , |

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A study in the October Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, official publication of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM reports that statistics for Metabolic Syndrome (leptin and/or insulin resistance), could be as high as 1 in 4 American workers!

This cluster of resistance syndromes that result in premature aging, heart disease, obesity, diabetes and other inflammatory and immune system challenges is affecting so many people in the western world or who take on our western diet.

Metabolic syndrome is defined as having at least three of five disease risk factors: large waist circumference (more than 40 inches for men and 35 inches for women), high triglyceride levels, reduced levels of high-density cholesterol (HDL, or “good” cholesterol), high blood pressure, and high glucose levels. People with metabolic syndrome are at high risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes.

In the workplace sample, men and women had similar rates of metabolic syndrome, although men had a higher average number of risk factors. As the number of risk factors increased, so did the rate of lifestyle health risks such as obesity, low physical activity, high stress, and smoking. Workers with metabolic syndrome were also more likely to rate their own health as fair to poor, compared to workers with fewer risk factors.

Workers with more risk factors missed more work days because of illness. The percentage of workers with three or more sick days in the previous year increased from 25 percent for those with no risk factors to 39 percent for those with all five risk factors.

Metabolic syndrome was not linked to increased “presenteeism”-days the employee was at work but performing at less than full capacity because of health reasons. There was a trend toward higher rates of short-term disability, but this was not significant.

Affecting approximately 69 million U.S. adults, metabolic syndrome has major health and economic consequences. The new study is one of the first to examine the effects of metabolic syndrome in the working population.

The results draw attention to the high rate and impact of metabolic syndrome among U.S. workers. Dr. Burton and colleagues call for further studies to assess the impact of metabolic syndrome in the workforce, as well as to evaluate programs to identify and treat these high-risk workers.” Medical News Today

Another report states that studies into Metabolic Syndromes show that increasing your intake of calcium rich foods and getting some exercise could cut your risk of ending up with these health challenges and even manage them well enough to get off your medication.

“Health behaviors also appeared to have a significant influence. The researchers found that adults who reported little or no daily exercise had nearly twice the risk of developing the condition.

In addition, adults who failed to consume calcium-rich foods regularly had about 1.5 times the risk of developing metabolic syndrome, compared to adults who ate calcium-rich diets.” Medical News Today

There are methods that work, if you have any of the symtoms of Metabolic Syndrome, Insulin Resistance or Leptin Resistance we may have an answer:

Coming soon our new Vibr-Trim Weight Loss Studio will be opening soon online and in centre. More news soon.

Be Fit! Be Well! do it online…

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Secrets of Long Life by Controlling Leptins

Posted on April 16, 2008. Filed under: health, weightloss, wellbeing | Tags: |

This video is clear, start thinking about how to change your lifestyle right now and live long and strong for longer. This information can also be found, along with a complete lifestyle plan in my eBook, “A Rainbow On My Plate.” Check it out today.

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