Your Waistline Could Double Your Risk of Premature Death

Posted on November 17, 2008. Filed under: health, weightloss, wellbeing | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

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This news item at Medical News Today says it all:

Large Waist Nearly Doubles Death Risk:

“The researchers wrote that previous studies relied heavily on BMI (body mass index, a person’s weight in kilos divided by the square of their height in metres) to assess the link between body fat (adiposity) and risk of death, but not many had looked into the effect of how the body fat is distributed.

For the study the researchers used data from 359,387 participants from 9 countries that were taking part in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), one of the largest long-term prospective studies in the world. The average age of the participants when data were first collected was 51.5 years, and 65.4 per cent were women.

Using a statistical tool called Cox regression analysis the investigators looked for links between BMI, waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio with risk of death, while taking into account other factors like age, location, education, smoking, alcohol, exercise and height.

The results showed that:

  • 14,723 of the participants died over a mean follow up period of 9.7 years.
  • Participants with a high BMI, compared with those in the medium range, were more likely to die from cardiovascular diseases and cancer.
  • Participants with a low BMI were more likely to die from respiratory diseases.
  • BMI of 25.3 for men and 24.3 for women was linked to the lowest risk of death.
  • After adjusting for BMI, waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio were strongly linked to risk of death.
  • The 20 per cent of participants with the largest waist circumferences (the top quintile) had waistlines measuring more than 120 cm or 47.2 in for men and more than 100 cm or 39.4 in for women.
  • The 20 per cent with the smallest waist circumferences (the bottom quintile) had waists smaller than 80 cm or 31.5 in for men and less than 65 cm or 25.6 in for women.
  • For every 5 cm increase in waist circumference the risk of death went up by 17 per cent in men and 13 per cent in women.
  • Comparing the top quintile for men had a relative risk of death of 2.05 (95 per cent confidence interval(CI) of 1.80 to 2.33) and for women this figure was 1.78 (95 per cent CI 1.56 to 2.04).
  • For waist to hip ratio the top to bottom quintile relative risks were 1.68 (95 per cent CI 1.53 to 1.84) for men and 1.51 (95 per cent CI 1.37 to 1.66) for women.

The results also supported earlier findings that BMI is strongly linked to risk of death in that, as the authors explained:

“BMI remained significantly associated with the risk of death in models that included waist circumference or waist-to-hip ratio (P<0.001).”

They conclude that these findings:

“Suggest that both general adiposity and abdominal adiposity are associated with the risk of death and support the use of waist circumference or waist -to-hip ratio in addition to BMI in assessing the risk of death.”

In a separate statement, the team from Imperial College London wrote that the study provides strong evidence that:

“Storing excess fat around the waist poses a significant health risk, even in people not considered to be overweight or obese.”

They said doctors should measure waistlines and hips as well as BMI when doing routine health checks.

The researchers found that waist to hip ratios varied widely among different countries in Europe.

They suggested that the reason increased waistlines are linked to higher risk of death could be that fatty tissue in the abdomen secretes cytokines, hormones and chemicals that are known to increase the risk of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases and cancer.

The lead author of the study, Dr Tobias Pischon, a Private Docent at the German Institute of Human Nutrition in Potsdam-Rehbrücke, explained that:

“Abdominal fat is not only a mere energy depot, but it also releases messenger substances that can contribute to the development of chronic diseases. This may be the reason for the link.”

The European coordinator of EPIC, professor Elio Riboli, from the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health at Imperial College London, said:

“Although smaller studies have suggested a link between mortality and waist size, we were surprised to see the waist size having such a powerful effect on people’s health and premature death.”

“Our study shows that accumulating excess fat around your middle can put your health at risk even if your weight is normal based on body mass index scores,” he added.

Riboli said that apart from smoking and drinking there are few other individual characteristics that can increase a person’s likelihood of early death.

Although the study did not look into why some people have larger waistlines the researchers suggested this was mainly due to genetic factors, physically inactive lifestyles and poor diets.

Riboli said:

“The good news is that you don’t need to take an expensive test and wait ages for the result to assess this aspect of your health – it costs virtually nothing to measure your waist and hip size.”

He said if you have a large waist you should exercise every day, avoid drinking too much alcohol and improve your diet.

“This could make a huge difference in reducing your risk of an early death,” he added.”

What can you do? Keep a lookout for our announcement coming soon, Wam Fit and Well introduces:

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Metabolic Syndrome Leptin and Insulin Resistance Taking Over

Posted on November 10, 2008. Filed under: health, weightloss | Tags: , , , , , , |

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A study in the October Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, official publication of the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM reports that statistics for Metabolic Syndrome (leptin and/or insulin resistance), could be as high as 1 in 4 American workers!

This cluster of resistance syndromes that result in premature aging, heart disease, obesity, diabetes and other inflammatory and immune system challenges is affecting so many people in the western world or who take on our western diet.

Metabolic syndrome is defined as having at least three of five disease risk factors: large waist circumference (more than 40 inches for men and 35 inches for women), high triglyceride levels, reduced levels of high-density cholesterol (HDL, or “good” cholesterol), high blood pressure, and high glucose levels. People with metabolic syndrome are at high risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes.

In the workplace sample, men and women had similar rates of metabolic syndrome, although men had a higher average number of risk factors. As the number of risk factors increased, so did the rate of lifestyle health risks such as obesity, low physical activity, high stress, and smoking. Workers with metabolic syndrome were also more likely to rate their own health as fair to poor, compared to workers with fewer risk factors.

Workers with more risk factors missed more work days because of illness. The percentage of workers with three or more sick days in the previous year increased from 25 percent for those with no risk factors to 39 percent for those with all five risk factors.

Metabolic syndrome was not linked to increased “presenteeism”-days the employee was at work but performing at less than full capacity because of health reasons. There was a trend toward higher rates of short-term disability, but this was not significant.

Affecting approximately 69 million U.S. adults, metabolic syndrome has major health and economic consequences. The new study is one of the first to examine the effects of metabolic syndrome in the working population.

The results draw attention to the high rate and impact of metabolic syndrome among U.S. workers. Dr. Burton and colleagues call for further studies to assess the impact of metabolic syndrome in the workforce, as well as to evaluate programs to identify and treat these high-risk workers.” Medical News Today

Another report states that studies into Metabolic Syndromes show that increasing your intake of calcium rich foods and getting some exercise could cut your risk of ending up with these health challenges and even manage them well enough to get off your medication.

“Health behaviors also appeared to have a significant influence. The researchers found that adults who reported little or no daily exercise had nearly twice the risk of developing the condition.

In addition, adults who failed to consume calcium-rich foods regularly had about 1.5 times the risk of developing metabolic syndrome, compared to adults who ate calcium-rich diets.” Medical News Today

There are methods that work, if you have any of the symtoms of Metabolic Syndrome, Insulin Resistance or Leptin Resistance we may have an answer:

Coming soon our new Vibr-Trim Weight Loss Studio will be opening soon online and in centre. More news soon.

Be Fit! Be Well! do it online…

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Just One Exercise Session Can Kick Start Your Metabolism

Posted on September 28, 2008. Filed under: weightloss, wellbeing | Tags: , , , , , , |

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Scientists at the University of Michegan have found that it only takes one, yes 1 exercise session to kick start your metabolism. Giving hope to millions of overweight and obese individuals this makes every session seem worthwhile.

At times, when you are over weight all the exercise and lifestyle dietary changes can seem to be useless, it can be so difficult to keep your motivation up and your pain levels down when beginning and continuing on your weight loss and health journey. Yet, this news gives all of us hope.

Most weight related issues are now known to be caused by metabolic disorders such as insulin and leptin resistance, and the lifestyle changes needed to prevent many of the diseases associated with these health challenges can be a bit daunting. They are simple changes, but not always easy as one of the challenges of this kind of metabolic syndrome is depression.

However, if even one session of exercise can re-start our metabolism and increase our fat burning rate, we can keep our motivation up one session at a time.  “According to Andrea Cornford, a member of the research team, “Exercise decreases everyone’s insulin resistance and therefore reduces the chances of developing diseases such as type 2 diabetes. This study shows that even a single bout of exercise helps obese individuals increase their body’s fat-burning rate and improve their metabolic health.”

A team of researchers has examined the effect of exercise on fat accumulation in a new study involving five obese women. In one session the women overate and did not exercise; in a follow-on session they overate and did exercise. The researchers found that:

  • the body’s fat-burning oxidation rate was reduced after one day of overeating;
  • conversely, just one session of exercise increased the rate of fat-burning oxidation; and
  • exercise increased the amount of fat that would eventually be stored in the muscle.Science Daily

To learn more about Insulin and Leptin Resistance my downloadable eBook, “Sick, Tired & Overweight” will tell you what you need to know and for information on lifestyle designed to reduce and even eliminate metabolic syndromes and the causes of overweight, “A Rainbow on My Plate.

If you would like to be a part of our exciting November launch of our NEW Lifestyle Approach to a slimmer, healthier you the, Wam Vibr-Slim Program please keep a look out for our announcment, right here on this blog or on the website which can be found by clicking on the Wam Logo.

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